MINNEAPOLIS — After a third consecutive night of protests in Minneapolis and in several other major U.S. cities, authorities on Friday arrested former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin on third-degree murder and manslaughter charges in the death of George Floyd.

Floyd, 46, died Monday after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders showed a Minneapolis police officer identified as Chauvin holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd pleaded for air, sparking outrage.

Update 10:45 p.m. EDT May 29: A reporter and anchor for WCCO-TV said that the wife of ex-police officer Derek Chauvin has released a statement through an attorney saying she is devastated by George Floyd’s death.

Kellie Chauvin,Through her attorney wife of former Officer Derek Chauvin the former Minneapolis Police Officer charged with murdering #GeorgeFloyd released a statement saying she is devastated by Floyd’s death, sends condolences to his family and is divorcing her husband @wcco pic.twitter.com/A5n7bYgdbK

Update 9:55 p.m. EDT May 29: Protesters have reportedly overrun the 88th Precinct in Brooklyn. Other precincts in Brooklyn are under siege according to reports.

#Breaking: NYPD source informs me 88 Pct in Brooklyn just been overrun. Police Commissioner Shea has called a Level 3 mobilization. Requires all special units respond and four cars from every command in the city to location.84 Pct under siege, as well. Also, Brooklyn North.

Update 9:35 p.m. EDT May 29: Protesters in Atlanta threw rocks and smoke grenades into the CNN lobby in what is believed to be an attempt to breach the lobby.

The doors to CNN Center in Atlanta have been smashed and rocks are being thrown at officers who are inside the lobby of the building. @CNNValencia doing an amazing job reporting from inside our home base. pic.twitter.com/Km4daOyhYd

Update 9:05 p.m. EDT May 29: The booking photo of ex-police officer Derek Chauvin has been released by Ramsey County jail.

Update 8:50 p.m. EDT May 29: The lockdown has been lifted at the White House.

Update 8 p.m. EDT May 29: At least one protester was tackled by Secret Service following protests near the White House.

RIGHT NOW: White House. Secret Service tackled someone. Large crowd gathering them. More police coming. @wusa9 pic.twitter.com/rCXuB6NhQj

The White House has been locked down and the secret service is not letting anyone off the grounds according to CNN.

NEWS: White House is under lockdown orders from the U.S. Secret Service amid protests outside the gates over George Floyd, @MarioDParker reports.

Update 7:45 p.m. EDT May 29: Activists spray-painted a large CNN logo outside the company’s headquarters in Atlanta, breaking a window and tagging doors while protesting the death of George Floyd.

Hundreds of protesters were confronting police outside CNN’s downtown headquarters late Friday. One protester climbed on top of the CNN sign and waved a “Black Lives Matter” flag to cheers from the crowd.

Shortly before 5:30 p.m., a scuffle happened between a protester and an Atlanta police officer right outside the CNN Center.

Protesters pelted officers who came over with bottles, striking some of them. Other bottles thrown at authorities exploded behind the police line, but no officers appeared to get hit. Protesters chanted, “Quit your jobs.”

The officers backed their line away from the group of protesters who were throwing objects at them.

Police formed a barricade and they are keeping protesters at bay right now so they can’t go any further down the street.

This comes after protesters peacefully marched from Centennial Olympic Park to the state Capitol, and then back. The tense moments came as it appeared protesters started leaving Centennial Olympic Park.

Update 5:55 p.m. EDT May 29: President Donald Trump says he talked to members of George Floyd’s family on Friday and “expressed my sorrow.”

“I want to express our Nation’s deepest condolences and most heartfelt sympathies to the family of George Floyd.” pic.twitter.com/eGRIJCiHUa

Trump spoke about his conversation with members of the Floyd family during a White House meeting with businesses executives. He says of the encounter with police captured on video that “it was just a horrible thing to witness and to watch. It certainly looked like there was no excuse for it.”

Trump says the family grieved during the call and that “I could see very much that they loved their brother.”

Trump was also asked about his tweet saying “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” He says he had heard that phrase for a long time, but didn’t know where it originated.

He says the phrase is “very accurate in the sense that, when you do have looting like you had last night, people often get shot and they die. And that’s not good and we don’t want that to happen.”

Trump also spoke about the looters, saying they did a great disservice to their state, city and the country. He said “we can never let that happen again.”

The president also says of the city and its mayor “I don’t think they were very well prepared. But we brought in the National Guard. They will be very prepared tonight.”

Update 5:55 p.m. EDT May 29: NBA veteran Stephen Jackson says he’ll use his platform and “everything I have to get a conviction” for the four Minneapolis police officers who were fired after George Floyd’s death.

Jackson, like Floyd, is from Houston and they were friends. The handcuffed black man died after pleading for air as a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck.

That officer, Derek Chauvin, was arrested Friday and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. The charges were announced shortly after Jackson spoke at a news conference organized by activists at Minneapolis City Hall. Actor Jamie Foxx and Minnesota Timberwolves star Karl-Anthony Towns were among those in attendance.

Jackson is 42. He played for eight NBA teams from 2000-2013 and won a championship in 2003 with the San Antonio Spurs.

Both were star high school athletes in the Houston area in the 1990s. Floyd had moved to Minneapolis two years ago for a fresh start.

Update 4:55 p.m. EDT May 29: Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey imposed a curfew throughout the city starting at 8 p.m. CDT. The proclamation will extend through the weekend.

Mayor Frey has issued Emergency Regulation No. 2020-2-1 which imposes a curfew throughout the City of Minneapolis beginning at 8 p.m. tonight (Fri., May 29) and extends through the weekend.See the posted regulation for details at: https://t.co/iebgleKnyx pic.twitter.com/7l61oURPtc

Update 3:55 p.m. EDT May 29: A Minneapolis police officer charged Friday with murder in the death of George Floyd kept his knee pressed to Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes in total Monday, according to a criminal complaint filed Friday.

Prosecutors said that body camera footage showed Floyd appeared to stop moving three minutes before former Officer Derek Chauvin took his knee off Floyd’s neck. In video footage captured by passersby, Floyd can be heard pleading for air before going silent as onlookers demanded Chauvin get off the 46-year-old.

Prosecutors said Floyd appeared to stop moving around 8:24 p.m. A minute later, officials said he appeared to stop breathing.

Officials said another police officer asked whether Floyd should be moved onto his side, but no one moved him. Another officer checked for a pulse and said he couldn’t find one.

Authorities said that preliminary findings from Floyd’s autopsy showed “no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation.”

“Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease,” according to prosecutors. “The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by the police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.”

Update 3:40 p.m. EDT May 29: Echoing comments he made at an earlier news conference, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz called the arrest Friday of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin “a good first step toward justice for George Floyd.”

However, the governor said, “it doesn’t change the system problems and persistent inequities that led to his death or the pain our communities live with every day.”

Walz said earlier Friday that he had requested the Hennepin County Attorney move quickly to investigate Floyd’s death and bring justice to his family.

Update 3:30 p.m. EDT May 29: The family of George Floyd, the man who died Monday after video footage showed a police officer with his knee to Floyd’s neck for minutes as he struggled to breathe, called the officer’s arrest “welcome but overdue.”

Family members and attorney Ben Crump, who is representing the Floyd family, said they want former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin to face first-degree murder charges. He was arrested Friday on charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter.

“We call on authorities to revise the charges to reflect the true culpability of this officer,” the statement said. “While this is a right and necssary step, we need the City of Minneapolis — and cities across the country — to fix the policies and training deficiencies that permitted this unlawful killing — and so many others — to occur.”

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said this week that the technique used by Chauvin to subdue Floyd while detaining him for questioning in connection with a possible forgery in progress had not been approved by police and should have never been used.

“Today, George Floyd’s family is having to explain to his children why their father was executed by police on video,” according to the statement.

“It’s essential that the City closely examines and changes its policing policies and training procedures to correct for the lack of proper field supervision; the use of appropriate non-lethal restraint techniques; the ability to recognize medical signs associated with the restriction of airflow, and the legal duty to seek emergency medical care and stop a civil rights violation.”

FAMILY STATEMENT: The family of #GeorgeFloyd and I released the following statement in response to the arrest of Derek Chauvin, the officer videoed kneeling on George Floyd’s neck. #JusticeForFloyd #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd pic.twitter.com/BkSFRlYB6j

Update 3:05 p.m. EDT May 29: President Donald Trump on Friday defended a tweet he sent earlier in the day that was flagged by Twitter for “glorifying violence” arguing that his post was “spoken as a fact, not as a statement.”

“Looting leads to shooting, and that’s why a man was shot and killed in Minneapolis on Wednesday night – or look at what just happened in Louisville with 7 people shot,” the president wrote.

“It was spoken as a fact, not as a statement. It’s very simple, nobody should have any problem with this other than the haters, and those looking to cause trouble on social media.”

….It was spoken as a fact, not as a statement. It’s very simple, nobody should have any problem with this other than the haters, and those looking to cause trouble on social media. Honor the memory of George Floyd!

Trump did not address his tweets or the death of George Floyd during a news conference Friday afternoon at the White House.

Early on Friday, Trump posted a message on social media calling protesters in Minneapolis “thugs” and warning that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

….It was spoken as a fact, not as a statement. It’s very simple, nobody should have any problem with this other than the haters, and those looking to cause trouble on social media. Honor the memory of George Floyd!

According to NPR, the phrase “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” is a well-known phrase dating back to the civil rights era. Miami police Chief Walter Headley said the same thing in 1967 during hearings on crime in his jurisdiction, prompting outrage, NPR reported.

“He had a long history of bigotry against the black community,” professor Clarence Lusane of Howard University told NPR.

Update 2:55 p.m. EDT May 29: In a statement obtained Friday by the Star Tribune, Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said that the arrest of former police Officer Derek Chauvin is an “essential first step.”

“For our black community who have, for centuries, been forced to endure injustice in a world simply unwilling to correct or acknowledge it: I know that whatever hope you feel today is tempered with skepticism and a righteous outrage,” he said.

“We are a nation at a crossroad, and today’s decision from the County Attorney is an essential first step on a longer road toward justice and healing our city.”

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said Friday that his office continues to investigate possible charges against the other three officers involved in Floyd’s death.

Update 2:35 p.m. EDT May 29: U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr said Friday that the FBI and the Justice Department have launched an independent investigation into whether any federal civil rights laws were violated in the death of George Floyd.

In a statement, Barr called footage of the encounter between Floyd and four Minneapolis police officers, including Derek Chauvin, “harrowing to watch and deeply disturbing.”

“The Department of Justice, including the FBI, are conducting an independent investigation to determine whether any federal civil rights laws were violated,” Barr said. “Both state and federal officers are working diligently and collaboratively to ensure that any available evidence relevant to these decisions is obtained as quickly as possible. … I am confident justice will be served.”

Update 2:20 p.m. EDT May 29: Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said Friday that he expects charges will be filed against the three other officers who were involved in George Floyd’s death following the arrest Friday afternoon of former Officer Derek Chauvin.

“I anticipate charges but I’m not going to get into that,” he said at a news conference.

He declined to discuss the evidence that led to Chauvin’s arrest one day after he said authorities needed more time to gather evidence. He said among the items authorities reviewed were the video shot by bystander Darnella Frazier which sparked widespread outrage on social media, Chauvin’s body camera footage and a preliminary report from the medical examiner.

Freeman announced Friday that Chauvin was arrested on third-degree murder and manslaughter charges in Floyd’s death. He was taken into custody by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

Update 2:08 p.m. EDT May 29: The Hennepin County Attorney, Mike Freeman, said Friday that former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd.

Update 2:05 p.m. EDT May 29: NFL free agency Colin Kaepernick on Friday announced the launch of a legal defense fund to help protesters arrested amid unrest in Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd.

The legal defense initiative was created with Kaepernick’s Know Your Rights Camp, a campaign funded by the former San Francisco 49er aimed at empowering black and brown communities.

In solidarity w/ our brothers & sisters in Minneapolis, KYRC + @kaepernick7 established our Legal Defense Initiative to support Freedom Fighters on the ground. If you, or a loved one needs legal assistance, or to donate, go to https://t.co/BQO5g9f5wb #wegotus pic.twitter.com/5g3wn1wXso

Kaepernick played with the 49ers until 2016 and faced heavy criticism for his decision to kneel during the national anthem in protest of police brutality.

Update 1:50 p.m. EDT May 29: Protesters gathered Friday outside former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin’s home in Central Florida after rumors swirled that he would relocate to the area as protests over the death of George Floyd continue in Minneapolis, WFTV reported.

Deputies with the Orange County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement Friday that Chauvin was not at his home in Florida and that he had no plans to visit the area.

For the safety of our community, we have verified that the Minneapolis Police Department officer with a home in Windermere in unincorporated Orange County is not at that home, and has no plans to be in the area. #GeorgeFloyd pic.twitter.com/csmsugRgqy

Deputies told WFTV there had been no calls for service at the former police officer’s home before Thursday, when two calls came in but no reports were filed.

Update 1:25 p.m. EDT May 29: Pop superstar Taylor Swift took to Twitter on Friday to criticize President Donald Trump after he posted a message on social media calling protesters in Minneapolis “thugs” and warning that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

“After stoking the fires of white supremacy and racism your entire presidency, you have the nerve to feign moral superiority before threatening violence?” Swift wrote. “We will vote you out in November.”

After stoking the fires of white supremacy and racism your entire presidency, you have the nerve to feign moral superiority before threatening violence? ‘When the looting starts the shooting starts’??? We will vote you out in November. @realdonaldtrump

Update 1:15 p.m. EDT May 29: John Harrington, commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said Friday that he’s received word that Officer Derek Chauvin has been taken into custody, according to multiple reports.

The Star Tribune reported Chauvin was taken into custody by the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

NEW: Minnesota Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington said he just received information that the officer identified as Derrick Chauvin in the death of George Floyd has been taken into custody by the BCA

The newspaper reported the other three officers involved in Floyd’s death had not been charged as of early Friday afternoon.

Update 12:40 p.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz on Friday criticized a tweet from President Donald Trump in which he called people protesting the death of George Floyd “thugs” and warned that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

“It’s not helpful,” Walz said Friday at a news conference. “In the moment where we’re at, in a moment that is so volatile, anything we do to add fuel to that fire is really not helpful. … There is a way to do this without inflaming (tensions).”

Twitter flagged the president’s tweet for “glorifying violence,” prompting a series of tweets from Trump criticizing the social media site. A similar tweet posted on the official White House Twitter page was also flagged for the same reasons.

Update 12:20 p.m. EDT May 29: Former President Barack Obama on Friday said everyone has the responsibility of working to ensure that a “new normal” is created “in which the legacy of bigotry and unequal treatment no longer infects our institutions or our hearts.”

His comments came as Americans nationwide deal with the ongoing threat of the coronavius pandemic and four days after George Floyd.

“It’s natural to wish for life ‘to just get back to normal’ as a pandemic and economic crisis upend everything around us,” he said.

“But we have to remember that for millions of Americans, being treated differently on account of race is tragically, painfully, maddeningly ‘normal’ — whether it’s while dealing with the health care system or interacting with the criminal justice system, or jogging down the street, or just watching birds in a park.”

Obama said officials in Minnesota will be tasked with ensuring Floyd’s death is thoroughly investigated and that justice is carried out.

“But it falls on all of us, regardless of our race or station — including the majority of men and women in law enforcement who take pride in doing their tough job the right way, every day — to work together to create a ‘new normal.’”

Update 12:10 p.m. EDT May 29: Wisconsin Attorney General Josh Kaul called Friday for charges to be filed against the four officers involved in the death Monday of George Floyd.

“What America witnessed happening to George Floyd in Minneapolis was not, in any true sense of the phrase, law enforcement. It was torture and murder, under color of law,” Kaul said in a statement.

“Justice demands that those involved in this depraved crime be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.”

What America witnessed happening to George Floyd in Minneapolis was not, in any true sense of the phrase, law enforcement. It was torture and murder, under color of law. Justice demands that those involved in this depraved crime be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. pic.twitter.com/lXRo9cr2AE

Officials in Minnesota said at a news conference Friday that they expect justice for the officers involved in Floyd’s death will be “swift.”

Update 12 p.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz and state Attorney General Keith Ellison said Friday that they believe justice will be “swift” for the officers involved in the death Monday of George Floyd.

“It is my expectation that justice for the officers involved in this will be swift. That it will come in a timely manner. That it will be fair,” Walz said Friday at a news conference. “That is what we’ve asked for.”

Ellison said that, following Minnesota law, the charging decisions will come from the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office.

“I believe that the message has been sent and received that the wheels of justice must move swiftly,” Ellison said. “It’s important that people have confidence that accountability is how we live in Minnesota.”

Update 11:50 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz apologized Friday for the arrest earlier in the day of a CNN crew which was broadcast live on air.

Walz said officers were clearing streets on his order when they arrested CNN journalist Omar Jimenez and two other of the network’s crew. The governor stressed Friday that it is imperative that officials come up with a plan to allow journalists to continue their work safely.

Walz said transparency, including allowing for reporters to cover the situation in Minneapolis, “is a key component of how we fix this.”

The governor said he spoke to CNN President Jeff Zucker after Friday morning’s arrest and apologized.

“I am a teacher by trade and I have spent my time as governor highlighting the need to be as transparent as possible and have the press here and I failed you,” Walz said.

Update 11:45 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz on Friday said he was grateful that Darnella Frazier caught video of Officer Derek Chauvin holding his knee to George Floyd’s neck Monday before Floyd’s death.

“Thank God a young person had a camera to video it,” Walz said. “Because there’s not a person who is listening today who wonders how many times that camera wasn’t there.”

Update 11:35 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz is holding a news conference Friday after a third night of protests across Minneapolis and other cities in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

Update 11:15 a.m. EDT May 29: Minneapolis City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins told MSNBC on Friday that George Floyd and the Minneapolis police officer seen kneeling on his neck for more than five minutes before his death Monday knew one another.

Jenkins said Floyd and Officer Derek Chauvin worked together for 17 years as bouncers at El Nuevo Rodeo, a Latin club in Minneapolis.

“Officer Chauvin, he knew George,” Jenkins said. “They were co-workers for a very long time.”

Andrea Jenkins, vice president of Minneapolis City Council, says George Floyd and Officer Chauvin worked at restaurant near Third Precinct. “They were coworkers for a very long time.” pic.twitter.com/IrwJvmxchI

Update 10:40 a.m. EDT May 29: First lady Melania Trump on Friday urged the nation to focus on “peace, prayers (and) healing” as protests erupted in Minneapolis and other cities due to the death of George Floyd.

“Our country allows for peaceful protests, but there is no reason for violence,” the first lady wrote in a post Friday morning on Twitter. “I’ve seen our citizens unify (and) take care of one another through (COVID-19 and) we can’t stop now.”

Our country allows for peaceful protests, but there is no reason for violence. I’ve seen our citizens unify & take care of one another through COVID19 & we can’t stop now. My deepest condolences to the family of George Floyd. As a nation, let’s focus on peace, prayers & healing.

Protesters set fire to a Minneapolis police precinct station late Thursday in the third night of protests against Floyd’s killing. Video of his death Monday surfaced this week, showing a Minneapolis police officer holding his knee to Floyd for more than five minutes as he lay prone on the ground begging for air.

Floyd’s death sparked backlash and prompted protests in several cities with more planned over the coming weekend.

Update 10:05 a.m. EDT May 29: Officials with Twitter flagged a tweet from the official White House Twitter account on Friday for “glorifying violence.”

“These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd, and I won’t let that happen. Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!” https://t.co/GDwAydcAOw

The tweet included the exact same language as a tweet posted earlier Friday by President Donald Trump in which he called people protesting police brutality in Minneapolis following the death Monday of George Floyd “thugs.” He also threatened to send National Guard troops to the city to keep peace and warned that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

Update 9:30 a.m. EDT May 29: The feud between Twitter and President Donald Trump escalated Friday after officials with the social media site flagged a tweet from the president for “glorifying violence” after he threatened to use force against rioters in Minneapolis.

“These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd,” Trump wrote, referring to the black man who died after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his head and neck for an extended period of time earlier this week. The president then spoke of sending in National Guard troops to restore order, warning that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

That was evidently too much for Twitter, which placed a warning on the president’s tweet.

“Twitter is doing nothing about all of the lies & propaganda being put out by China or the Radical Left Democrat Party,” the president tweeted soon after 7 a.m. “They have targeted Republicans, Conservatives & the President of the United States.”

Update 8:50 a.m. EDT May 29: Officials with CNN disputed an account Friday from Minnesota State Patrol of the arrest of one of the news network’s journalists, Omar Jimenez.

Jimenez, who is black and Latino, was arrested early Friday while reporting on protests in Minneapolis that were sparked by the death Monday of George Floyd.

In a tweet posted Friday morning, Minnesota State Patrol said three members of a CNN crew were inadvertently arrested as authorities were clearing the streets after protests and riots over Floyd’s death.

“The three were released once they were confirmed to be members of the media,” according to authorities.

In the course of clearing the streets and restoring order at Lake Street and Snelling Avenue, four people were arrested by State Patrol troopers, including three members of a CNN crew. The three were released once they were confirmed to be members of the media.

However, officials with CNN shared video of the arrest, which happened live on national television.

CNN noted that another of its reporters, who is white, was not arrested Friday although he was near the area where Jimenez was arrested.

“I was treated much differently than (CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez) was,” journalist Josh Campbell said, according to CNN. “I’m sitting here talking to the National Guard, talking to the police. They’re asking politely to move here and there. A couple times I’ve moved closer than they would like. They asked politely to move back. They didn’t pull out the handcuffs. Lot different here than what Omar experienced.”

Update 8:30 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison told CNN on Friday morning that he anticipates charges will soon be filed against the four Minneapolis police officers involved in the death of George Floyd.

“We are standing by and helping any way we can,” Ellison told the news network. “I anticipate there will be charges. I hope soon. But that is the prerogative of another prosecuting authority.”

He told CNN that authorities were ensuring that their case was strong before announcing charges.

“Everybody believes that this is a violation of Mr. Floyd. And I believe that everybody wants to see these charges filed as soon as they can be,” he said. “But again, I do want to say we have seen cases that seem so clear go south.”

Update 7:49 a.m. EDT May 29: CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez and his crew have been released from police custody in Minneapolis, the network reported.

Jimenez, along with producer Bill Kirkos and photojournalist Leonel Mendez, were arrested during a live broadcast shortly after 6 a.m. The crew was reporting on protests of George Floyd’s death that turned violent overnight.

The team was released from the Hennepin County Public Safety facility in downtown Minneapolis moments ago, CNN reported.

Update 7:38 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz spoke with CNN President Jeff Zucker Friday morning after the network’s team in Minneapolis was arrested while covering the protests of George Floyd’s death that turned violent overnight.

Walz called the arrests “unacceptable,” said he “deeply apologizes” for what happened and is working to have the CNN team released immediately, the network reported.

Update 6:45 a.m. EDT May 29: CNN journalist Omar Jimenez has been taken into police custody during a live broadcast at the site of the Minneapolis protests, the network reported just before 6:30 a.m.

BREAKING: Live video on CNN shows CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez and crew being arrested by police in Minneapolis.CNN anchor says that the crew is being told that they were being arrested because they were told to move and didn’t.

The reporter’s crew, including a producer and camera operator, were also placed in handcuffs, CNN reported.

A CNN reporter & his production team were arrested this morning in Minneapolis for doing their jobs, despite identifying themselves – a clear violation of their First Amendment rights. The authorities in Minnesota, incl. the Governor, must release the 3 CNN employees immediately.

Update 6:25 a.m. EDT May 29: Police in Minneapolis clashed with protesters early Friday morning, following the third consecutive night of demonstrations challenging police brutality in the wake of George Floyd’s death while in police custody earlier this week.

According to CNN, the officers – some in riot gear – used pepper spray and batons to disperse crowds nearest the police station upon arrival.

Police were also seen shoving at least one person, while some protesters threw projectiles at the officers and others ran, CNN reported.

Update 3:20 a.m. EDT May 29: Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey addressed U.S. President Donald Trump’s tweet from earlier in the evening which criticized the weakness of the city’s leadership as Thursday night protests turned violent.

“Weakness is refusing to take responsibility for your own actions. Weakness is pointing your finger at somebody else, during a time of crisis. Donald Trump knows nothing about the strength of Minneapolis. We are strong as hell. Is this a difficult time period? Yes. But you better be damn sure that we’re going to get through this,” Frey said during a press conference.

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey:”Donald Trump knows nothing about the strength of Minneapolis. We are strong as hell … Is this a difficult time period? Yes. But you better be damn sure we’re gonna get through this.” pic.twitter.com/fkYQfO8kbd

Update 1:32 a.m. EDT May 29: In a series of early-morning tweets, U.S. President Donald Trump criticized protesters in Minneapolis, calling them “THUGS” and promising Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz the weight of the military if needed.

….These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd, and I won’t let that happen. Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!

Update 1:05 a.m. EDT May 29: A police spokesman told NPR all personnel at the overrun third precinct are safe, but city leaders warned residents near the blaze to maintain distance, following unconfirmed reports of a possible explosion.

“We’re hearing unconfirmed reports that gas lines to the Third Precinct have been cut and other explosive materials are in the building,” the city tweeted. “If you are near the building, for your safety, PLEASE RETREAT in the event the building explodes.”

We’re hearing unconfirmed reports that gas lines to the Third Precinct have been cut and other explosive materials are in the building. If you are near the building, for your safety, PLEASE RETREAT in the event the building explodes.

Original report: Protesters have overrun the Minneapolis Police Department Third Precinct, the third straight night of violent protests spreading beyond the city.

Flames are visible around the precinct but it is unclear if it is on fire.

Livestream video showed the protesters entering the building, where fire alarms blared and sprinklers ran as blazes were set. Police appeared to have left the building located in the neighborhood not far from where Floyd died Monday. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to messages left by The Associated Press.

Anger over the death of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man in police custody, has spread beyond Minneapolis with looting and fires set along a major St. Paul street.

Earlier Thursday, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz called in the National Guard to try to stem the violence. After calling in the Guard, Walz urged widespread changes in the wake of Floyd’s death.

We have activated more than 500 soldiers to St. Paul, Minneapolis and surrounding communities. Our mission is to protect life, preserve property and the right to peacefully demonstrate. A key objective is to ensure fire departments are able to respond to calls.

It was the third consecutive night of violent protests following Floyd’s death on Monday. In footage recorded by a bystander, Floyd can be seen pleading that he can’t breathe as Officer Derek Chauvin, who is white, kneels on his neck. As minutes pass, Floyd slowly stops talking and moving.

Dozens of businesses across the Twin Cities have boarded up windows and doors Thursday in an effort to prevent looting.

Minneapolis shut down nearly its entire light-rail system and all bus service through Sunday out of safety concerns.

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