“A male doctor in the ER told me I had an STI when I actually knew it was an ovarian cyst, because I was prone to them and told him so while I was sobbing in pain. I was also a teenager and a virgin. He flat out didn’t believe me and sent me home. It turned out the cyst was the size of a golf ball and had to be closely monitored in case it popped, luckily, it didn’t.”

“During my freshman year of high school, my hip and lower back started hurting really bad. I went to see specialists and doctors and no one knew what was wrong. I was also doing physical therapy to help with the pain. After a few months of PT, my male physical therapist told me that since I wasn’t getting any better, I probably had cancer. I didn’t.”

“I went to the hospital for extreme stomach pain, and was dismissed three times. The first male doctor was sure I was pregnant (I was only 16). The second said it was just period pain (I wasn’t on my period ). The third thought I was gassy or had heartburn. The fourth time I was taken in by ambulance because all I could do was scream and cry. Finally, after I passed out, I was admitted to the ER and had an emergency operation because I had a bleeding ulcer and my stomach had literally burst. It took a female doctor to understand that, and she was pretty mad when she heard how many times I’d been dismissed.”

“When I was in labor with my first child, it was progressing very slowly and my water had not broken in the traditional way, so they had me on Pitosin for 12 hours before they manually broke my water. As a result of all the Pitosin, I dilated from 3 cm to 10 cm in about 30 mins. I had opted for natural labor, so without an epidural or pain meds, my contractions went into overdrive and I pushed my son out really quickly. As a result of my suddenly rushed delivery, I ended up with vaginal tearing.

My husband and I were holding our son for the first time as they were sewing me up. During this precious moment, the doctor doing my sutures chimed in that he could ‘throw in an extra stitch’ for my husband. We were horrified.”

“I’d put off medication for my anxiety despite the suggestion from multiple therapists, because I’ve always been able to manage it with cognitive behavioral therapy and some coping mechanisms. Not this year though. I finally made an appointment with a psychiatrist. The doctor told me I was lucky, because my anxiety helped me be more ‘prepared for life’ and ‘be an overachiever.’ I didn’t feel lucky, I felt exhausted and broken.”

“My dentist did a filling that left me in horrible pain. After three days, I called to get back in and tell him something was not right. He told me I must have a low pain tolerance, ‘like most women.’ I told him I’d given birth to three children without any medication, so the only thing I had a low tolerance for was idiots like him. I never went back to him and had another dentist fix his shoddy work.”

“I went to the ER after being severely sick for weeks. I was sleeping on an incline, and couldn’t breathe at that point. I remember telling my husband I feared I wouldn’t wake up because I felt like I was drowning. I was so weak that I had to steady myself with the wall getting from point A to point B. When I told the male doctor that my lungs hurt, he looked at me with exasperation and said, ‘Your lungs can’t feel anything. They don’t have any nerves.’ All he did was test me for the flu, and said I came back negative. He gave me some antibiotics and an inhaler and sent me on my way. Turns out, I had COVID-19. Months later, I’m still struggling.”

“I had severe abdominal pain and lower back pain all day that caused vomiting and made it hard to move. I went to the hospital near my husband’s job. The doctor refused to do any imaging or tests, and stated, ‘Oh, I’m just so tired of girls your age coming in for pain medication.’ I went to another hospital the next day, and another doctor found a huge cyst on my ovary that had burst.”

“My period wouldn’t stop — I’m talking weeks of it — and I finally had no choice but to go to a doctor. The doctor said I must have a foreign object inside of me. When I explained to him that I didn’t, that my period refused to stop after nearly three weeks, he didn’t believe me and insisted that I must have stuck something up my vagina. He was smirking and looking me up and down at me the whole time. I went back home and kept on bleeding. After another week or so, I finally made an appointment with a separate clinic that treated mostly old people and families, and I got lucky and got a woman doctor. She did a blood test, and I had Hashimoto’s disease, which can be very serious if not treated.”

“I had a doctor ask me, ‘Which one of us went to medical school? I know what I’m doing!’ before walking out of the room after I told him the prescribed medication wasn’t helping. It took me two more years to find a doctor who listened to what my body was telling me and believed my symptoms enough to run tests and discover I was at risk for thyroid cancer.”

“Last month, I went to the hospital because I was having severe pain in all the joints in my right leg, difficulty breathing, extreme chest pain, dizziness, and cold sweats. When the doctor asked why I was there, I told him my symptoms and that I was worried I might have a blood clot. He laughed at me. He refused to do any tests other than a D-dimer, and when that came back fine, he tried to push muscle relaxers on me, saying all I needed was to just relax and I’d feel better.

When I refused because I have anxiety about taking certain medications, he got really angry and told me I needed ‘serious mental health help,’ then told me I was fine and that I had social anxiety, and that was the cause of my symptoms, and then stormed out of the room. The next day I went and got tested for COVID-19. Turns out, I had COVID-19. That’s why I couldn’t breathe.”

“After I gave birth, I had to be stitched up, but right when the (male) doctor was about to start, he had to be called away. He came back an hour later and continued, and I was sure the local anesthesia had worn off because I could feel the needle going in and him pulling. I told him, but he laughed it off and said if that were true, ‘I would be on the roof.’ Needless to say, I didn’t get more anesthesia and just pulled through it. It was worse than giving birth.”

“I’ve been suffering Endo/PCOS symptoms since I was 16. At around 18 years old, I started actively seeing my doctor about this and pushing her to refer me to a gynecologist. Turned out, her husband was a gynecologist, and also the only one within 160 kms. He told me, ‘A laparoscopy is the LAST thing I’d want to do to you. You’re just fat and young. Lose weight and stop complaining, because it’s normal.’”

“I was experiencing constant nausea and could not eat. Sometimes, the nausea was so bad I couldn’t even get out of bed. I lost weight at an alarming rate. I wanted to eat so badly, and was so upset over it. My doctor told me, ‘You’re just anorexic’ and, ‘To just eat something.’ It got so bad that I had SEVERE dehydration because I couldn’t even drink anything, and was hospitalized. Labs showed my blood counts were off, so they tested me for leukemia. When it was negative, they discharged me with no answers, just ‘anorexia.’

A year or two later, I switched doctors and medical groups entirely. My new doctor actually listened and found some pretty big lymph nodes. Turns out, I had stage three and very aggressive cancer. If the first doctor had actually listened to me and tried more than one test, I could have been diagnosed earlier and it wouldn’t have been nearly as bad as it turned out to be. Thankfully, I am currently in remission and four years cancer-free!”

“I had some medical issues years ago. I would pass out randomly and be rushed to the emergency room for testing. While there, I saw a cardiologist since my chest would tense up right before. He saw my tattoo, and asked if it was there when I was born. He then told me my tattoo was the reason behind all my issues, because, ‘God didn’t put it there’ and was angry with me. He refused to help much after that.”

“My periods kept getting longer and heavier, so I made an appointment at the OB/GYN practice I’d always used. I saw a new, older doctor and when I explained why I was there, he told me there was nothing wrong that I shouldn’t be worried. That it was simply my body’s way of telling me it was ‘time to have kids.’ He told me to go home and, ‘make my husband’s night!’ I was speechless. I told him if he read my file he’d definitely see somewhere in there that I was gay. Secondly, I had zero desire for kids. His only response was was, ‘Well, then you should get used to heavier periods until menopause if you won’t do what your body wants, which is birthing a child.’ I’ve never actually wanted to punch someone until that day.”

“I once went to the doctor at my university after finally plucking up the courage to tell them that I had been experiencing really bad anxiety for a long time. He looked me in the eyes and said, ‘I’m really sick of all you students trying to claim anxiety or depression to get special treatment in exams.’ That was four years ago and I haven’t opened up about my anxiety to a doctor since.”

“I’d just had my daughter via C-section, and was around 48 hours postpartum when I started feeling a pressure on my chest and a drowning sensation every time I laid down to sleep. The doctor on duty was woken up by the worried nurse caring for me, and he came to my bedside grumpy because I’d interrupted his sleep. He said that the pressure was probably, and I quote because, ‘You have two huge boobs slapped on your chest that just filled up with milk,’ and that I couldn’t handle their new weight! Another doctor said they were sure it was just gas.

Two days later, on my last day at the hospital, my legs were still bloated and I hadn’t slept at all because of the drowning sensation I had every time I’d lie down. They still discharged me and 24 hours later I was in the ER in a very dire condition because, it turned out, I had postpartum preeclampsia. My blood pressure was so high that my body wasn’t able to pump the excess water out of my system, so water was even building up on my lungs and causing the drowning sensation! I almost died that day, and I am still looking for the strength to sue the doctors.”

Source: https://www.buzzfeed.com/shelbyheinrich/male-doctors-saying-horrible-things-to-women

News – 18 More Condescending Things Women Have Actually Been Told By Male Medical Professionals